The Power of the EATers’ Feedback

Like many of our food tech peers, data rules everything around us. With data we test, iterate, learn, and then repeat it all again—all with the aim of achieving perfection (or something close to it).

Here at EAT Club, an important type of data we gather is dish reviews and ratings from our EATers (that’s our charming nickname for EAT Club customers, who are not only users but also diners). Since we aim to provide an awesome experience, we view customer satisfaction as our “bread and butter.” Everything from food curation, to user experience design, to dish spotlight banners on the menu is done to bring joy to your office through our presence.

The Dish Whisperers

Our Culinary R&D and Merchandising teams are a passionate group of food experts, demand analysts, and trend forecasters. They meticulously plan menus to provide interesting variety, meet dietary preferences, and anticipate our EATers’ sophisticated tastes. Every day they examine ordering behavior, dish ratings (stars) and dish reviews (comments) to continuously improve our menu and food experience.

Dish reviews help us identify issues happening for more than an isolated few, while dish ratings help us to quantify performance. For example, before a dish is approved for general consumption, our Culinary R&D team puts the new candidate through several rounds of rigorous EATer testing. This is when reviews and ratings are absolutely crucial—they steer the fate of any new dish, determining whether they continue on as a permanent dish or get put out to pasture. (Sniff sniff…bibimbap. We still love you. Maybe we can try to make it work?)

And just like the unfortunate fate of bibimbap, there’s a substantial collection of dishes that just never passed muster or fell out of EATer’s favors. Many dishes never graduate from the testing phase or are retired due to low ratings or an uptick in bad reviews.

For instance, when a dish’s star rating slides to 3.6 stars, the dish is put on probation. (Of sorts. I know you’re imagining Chicken Cacciatore behind bars.) Once a dish is on probation, its ratings and reviews are monitored weekly and improvements are tried. But if even the best efforts of our Culinary team can’t save it, and ratings dip below 3.5 stars, it’s retired from our portfolio.

On the EATer Front Lines

As much as we try to hit every meal out of the park, there are times we fall short. When that happens, we believe it’s important to try our best to make it right by our EATers.

Low dish ratings are monitored not only by our Food team but our Member Services team, too. Every day, real people (as opposed to robots) from our Member Services team reach out to EATers who’ve experienced issues with their food. Detailed, constructive reviews really help our Member Services team in providing the best possible resolution.

Not only do we get direct feedback from EATers, but those interactions are vital because the Member Services team communicates that real-time feedback to the Food team, who can then make changes as quickly as possible.

Honestly and truly, we can say that EAT Club wouldn’t be where we are today without our EATers. Not just to eat our lovingly curated food, but also to give us candid and useful feedback that pushes us to be better with every meal we serve.

Join the Food Feedback Loop  

We know food is very personal. It’s a fact that gives our company purpose! We hope you’ve felt that your opinions and critiques are extremely valuable to us. Keep—or start!—reviewing the dishes you love, hate, and maybe love again so we can keep improving.

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